myers briggs personality test

Your Myers-Briggs Personality Type and Divorce

If you like learning more about your personality and how it relates to others, you have probably taken the Myers-Briggs personality test at some point. While it can change slightly over time or in certain situations, most people stay true to their assessments over the course of their lives. 

While there’s no clear-cut way to predict compatibility, certain personalities are better (or worse) at sustaining long-term, happy relationships. Keep reading to find out more about the Myers-Briggs personality test and how it can help you navigate your relationships.

What is the Myers-Briggs personality assessment?

The Myers-Briggs personality assessment is officially called the Myers-Briggs Trait Indicator (MBTI). It was developed by a mother and daughter team, Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabell Briggs Myers, during World War II and finally published in 1962. The assessment leans heavily on the personality theories of famed psychologist Carl Jung, who published the book Psychological Types: The Psychology of Individuation in 1921.

Why would I want to take a personality test?

Some people take personality tests and quizzes online because they enjoy thinking about and learning about themselves. A quality personality test may help you identify strengths and weaknesses and give you insight into yourself and ideas about personal growth. 

Personality tests might also help shed light on the nature of your relationships with others. In fact, researchers have studied potential correlations between Myers-Briggs personality types and marital satisfaction. 

Should I believe the results of a Myers-Briggs personality test?

Although some psychologists criticize the reliability of the Myers-Briggs Trait Indicator, others support it. It’s easily self-guided, and the results are easy to understand. Even if it’s not perfectly accurate, it’s thought-provoking. After all, you’re subjectively answering all the questions and how you think you are might differ from how you truly behave. 

One of the biggest benefits of a personality test like the MBTI is that invites test-takers to think about how they feel and act in certain situations, which promotes self-reflection.

Where can I take the Myers-Briggs personality test?

Although you would have to pay to take the official Myers-Briggs test and receive your results, plenty of online websites offer comparable tests with similar scoring systems. Therefore, it’s pretty easy to find an online variation of the Myers-Briggs test with free results. Note: You might be asked to provide your email address in order to receive your results.

Here are a few websites where you can learn about (and take) a test that assesses your personality type through the lens of the Myers-Briggs Trait Indicator:

Full disclosure: An online test like this should not be considered a substitute for professional psychological testing.

Possible outcomes of the Myers-Briggs personality test

Sixteen different results are possible. Each result represents a combination of your scores in four dichotomies:

  • The Extraversion (E) – Introversion (I) dichotomy
  • The Sensing (S) – Intuition (N) dichotomy
  • The Thinking (T) – Feeling (F) dichotomy
  • The Judging (J) – Perceiving (P) dichotomy

For example, if you lean more toward extraversion, intuition, thinking, and judging, your “type” would be ENTJ.

What is the Extroversion–Introversion dichotomy?

Most people are already familiar with the terms “extrovert” (also spelled “extravert”) and “introvert,” and many will readily inform you of their type. 

In a nutshell, those who lean toward extroversion gravitate toward social interaction and feel energized by it. Introverts look “inward” for stimulation and, although they may enjoy social interaction, they often feel drained and in need of rest after socializing.

A test may suggest that you are highly extroverted, highly introverted, or somewhere in between. If your test responses reflect a stronger leaning toward extroversion, the first letter of your “type” will be “E” for extrovert. If your test reflects a stronger leaning toward introversion, the first letter of your type will be “I” for introvert.

What is the Sensing–Intuition dichotomy?

The terms “sensing” and “intuition” reflect how a person gathers information from the world. 

Those who lean toward “sensing” tend to be hands-on and fact-oriented. They rely heavily on their senses (what they see, hear, and so on). Those who lean toward “intuiting” look for patterns and gather information about the world based on their impressions and perceptions.

The test may suggest that you rely strongly on your senses, that you rely strongly on your intuition, or somewhere in between. If your test reflects a stronger leaning toward sensing, the second letter of your “type” will be S. If your test responses reflect a stronger leaning toward intuition, the second letter of your “type” will be N.

What is the Thinking–Feeling dichotomy?

The terms “thinking” and “feeling” reflect how a person makes decisions

Those who lean toward “thinking” tend to place the highest value on facts and data when making decisions. Those who lean toward “feeling” tend to place the highest value on their emotions when making decisions or trusting their gut.

A test may suggest that you rely strongly on thinking when making decisions, that you rely strongly on your feelings when making decisions, or somewhere in between. If your test responses reflect a stronger leaning toward thinking, the third letter of your “type” will be T. If your test responses reflect a stronger leaning toward feeling, the third letter of your “type” will be F.

What is the Judging–Perceiving dichotomy?

The terms “judging” and “perceiving” reflect how a person interacts with the outside world. 

Those who lean toward “judging” tend to prefer controlled circumstances and structure. Those who lean toward “perceiving” tend to place a higher value on personal flexibility and the ability to adapt to change.

A test may suggest that you rely strongly on judgment when interacting with the world, that you rely strongly on your perceptions when interacting with the world, or somewhere in between. If your test responses reflect a stronger leaning toward judgment, the fourth and final letter of your “type” will be J. If your test responses reflect a stronger leaning toward perceptions, the fourth and final letter of your “type” will be P.

Getting your MBTI score

Sixteen scores are possible based on your responses to the set of personality test questions. Click each one to learn more about it and to gather tips on how, based on your personality type, you might best deal with the stresses of divorce.

Advice for Myers-Briggs personality types in divorce

Intrigued? If you already know your type — or if you decide to take a personality test modeled after the MBTI — click on one of the links above to learn more about your “type” and to read the divorce survival tips we offer to people of your type.

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